Board dates 2016-2017 scholarship boards

Here they are, the dates for this fall/winter’s board dates. If you are applying for a four year high school Army ROTC scholarship that will start in the fall of 2017, that would be a high school senior in the fall of 2016, these are the dates you should pay attention to.

4-year High School Application Opens for SY 17-18 12-Jun-16
1st High School Selection Board Deadline for Documents 7-Oct-16
1st High School Board-Ready List PMS Deadline 21-Oct-16
1st High School Selection Board 24-Oct-16
2nd High School Selection Board Deadline for Documents 6-Jan-17
2nd High School Board-Ready List PMS Deadline 20-Jan-17
2nd High School Selection Board 23-Jan-17
4-Year High School Application Deadline for SY 16-17 10-Jan-17
Final (3rd) HS Selection Board Deadline for Docs — Missing Items 28-Feb-17
3rd High School Board-Ready List PMS Deadline 10-Mar-17
Final (3rd) High School Selection Board  13-Mar-17

So, what does all this mean.  Same advice as last year…You should complete your application before the board that makes you the most competitive.  I would recommend you try to get in on one of the first two boards.  Waiting till the deadline and being seen by just one board is never the best course of action.  If you have a strong file you should be shooting to have your file complete by 2 October and reviewed by the first board.

Look at SAT/ACT dates. If you don’t do so well the first time you take those tests your second shot is usually some time shortly after the October board, so you should be shooting for the second board and submitting improved scores if your file isn’t strong. Here’s where you can get some help with those tests, use it.

If you wait until the second or third board your chances are diminished because there will obviously be less allocations available after each board but don’t rush to be on the first board if you aren’t ready.  I would tell you that you shouldn’t wait to be able to do one or two more push ups on the PFT, but if your SAT/ACT is low retake and wait for the next board.

As you go through the process make sure you read about all the components (this blog is a good source of information, if I do say so myself) and stay in touch with at least one of the recruiting officers at one of the schools on your list. Notice I said recruiting Officer, and not recruiter…there is still a difference.

 

How and where to start

When I started this blog 6 years ago (holy crap! 6 years ago!) some of the first posts were about how to start the scholarship process and how to get started in Army ROTC.  Time to bump that info back to the top of the blog and freshen it up a little. The optimal target audience for this information is a high school junior finishing up their junior year.  That student is considering college and has a desire to serve in the military. If you aren’t a high school junior and are interested we should still talk, there are plenty of ways to become an Army Officer. Here’s what I think my optimal audience should do.

Step one – do your research

Visit www.goarmy.com/rotc …poke around on the site.  Understand that Army ROTC is a program that trains college students to serve as Army Officers when they graduate from college. Look at the requirements.  Don’t be afraid to contact an Army ROTC Battalion and talk to an Enrollment Officer if you have questions.

Along with researching ROTC opportunities you’ll also need to figure out where you want to attend college and what you want to study.  You won’t be majoring in Army ROTC.  The internet is a great source of material.  You can use a search engine to develop a list of schools that offer what you want.  Most University websites will give you a good idea what they offer.  You can also usually find information about Army ROTC battalions too.  In our case we have a wealth of information on the Clarkson University website, and on social media platforms like facebook and instagram.

Step two – apply for the scholarship

Watch this video first.

If you follow the link to http://www.goarmy.com/rotc/high-school-students you will find a link to the four-year High School Scholarships and on that page you can start your application.  It is first going to ask you to create a goarmy.com account.  It is very important that once you create this account you return to the ROTC page and log in here.  I publish the various dates for the scholarship process once they are released each year.  Typically the window to apply opens in June before a high school students senior year.  The first board meets in October and the deadline to start the process is in early January.  Watch this blog for the dates.

A WORD OF CAUTION…If you are on the goarmy.com site you will see an apply online button. That is not the button for applying to Army ROTC.  That button takes you to the Army Career Explorer (ACE) which is focused on enlisted options for the most part.

goarmy.com

goarmy.com

Step three – keep in touch/start a dialogue

As you go through the process make sure you are letting people know you are interested in their program.  Whether it is a school or an Army ROTC battalion, we want to hear from you, and we will keep track of our conversations.  In my case I contact interested applicants often and track all correspondences.  Clarkson also does the same and I can cross reference their system and mine to see if an applicant is showing interest. If I hear from you often then you will get my help.  If you don’t respond to my emails I’m guessing you plan to attend another school.

You have to make sure you are providing good contact information.  If you provide an email address make sure it’s one you check often.  With the advent of mobile devices it should take days to respond to an email.

I also suggest that scanning and emailing is the best way to respond to requests for forms or documents.  On the application website you can scan and upload documents.  There is no reason why someone would put something in an envelope and mail it or fax a document these days.  Scan and upload when possible.

I also recommend you plan some campus visits once you narrow your list.  If you visit a college ask about meeting with someone from the ROTC program.  In my case, I encourage visitors to schedule their visit through the Admissions office, and ask to meet with Army ROTC.  Admissions does the rest.

Step four – Don’t give up

If you go through the high school process and don’t get an offer you can still attend college, enroll in Army ROTC class, and become an Army Officer.  You may have the opportunity to earn a campus based scholarship or take advantage of another program like the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP).  Not every Cadet is on scholarship.

 

 

What can a ROO see?

As an applicant, sometimes this process must seem hard to understand.  Some applicants receive a ton of coaching and feedback and others seem to be in the dark, always wondering where they stand and what the next step is.  So to shine a light on the subject…All ROOs aren’t the same. Some are more tech savy and some less. Some are capable of doing querys and extracting lists from our system, and some aren’t. Some are willing to help and some are at schools where they can sit back and let the prospects come to them (I’m looking at you SMCs).

The one thing we do all have in common is our main tool. The system we use is called the Cadet Command Information Management Module

CCIMM

Here is what we can see and what we might do with it:

We have access to a screen called the high school applicant contact list. It gives us a name, mailing address, phone number, and status. There are 5 statuses an applicant can be in Disqualified, Ineligible, Interviewee, Offer, and Alt Offer. What a ROO could do with this list is extract all the applicants into a spreadsheet and do a mail merge. Unless they wanted to spam the whole list they could filter out the disqualified or maybe the ones who already have offers. I’m hoping there aren’t any ROOs who would try to poach someone who already has an offer.  If the school is a regional draw they might want to use the contact information for a certain state or group of states.  I personally take this list and filter it for New York.  I’ll then look at that list and see if I see local applicants, or applicants from the Fort Drum region.  Then I might look up their information and offer my help.

We also have a screen called the high school applicant list. This screen shows us everyone who has applied, has one of our schools, and is in at least interviewee status. To be in interviewee status you have to at least submit transcripts and SAT/ACT test grades. This is the list I rely on. Each name is linked to their application, so if I need to see more I just click on their name. I use this information to determine where Clarkson ranks, how competitive they will be, and the screen allows me to give some feedback on things like the essay or an applicants list of extra curricular activities.  I’ll also print this off for my PMS when he does an interview with an applicant.

I can also get my Brigade to run a query of all applicants with one of my schools on their list, but I had to know to ask for it. About a month ago I asked Cadet Command for access to the applicant records in the data base, so I could run my own querys.  They told me I couldn’t have access to to those records, but my Brigade could provide the list. This list allows me see the applicants still in ineligible or qualified status. This allows me to reach out to them and let them know what they are still missing or what they need to do to be competitive. This list and the applicant list can be what sets a helpful ROO apart from the ROO that just sits back and hopes for the best. It also sets the helpful ROO apart from the ROO who just spams 1200 applicants.

I wanted to share this information, so you all know that if ROOs are creative they can see alot. Just because you got an email from ECU or Wentworth or any other school doesn’t mean your chances just went up or down. You are still on the list, you still may be competitive, and still need to have a backup plan.

 

Reader mail – Where’s the white space

Nothing like being tossed a softball for a lazy blogger.

Got an email today from someone who has been visiting the blog.  Here’s what it said:

I wanted to clarify something because I think the application has changed since your post in 2012. “use all the white space”
Did it in fact change, or am I missing it on the application. I’m only seeing a personal statement. Is there any place to explain achievements like on the college common app?
In fact the application does change from year to year and unfortunately I don’t always go back and update my old blog posts. If you are reading some of my posts pay attention to when they were written. That being said, things don’t change that much, and most of the old advice is still valid.
So, here is what I wrote back.
Questions like these are why I apply for the scholarship every year….If you click on the Selection Status tab in the online application website and scroll all the way down you will see the “white space”.  It’s now called “Additional Remarks”, but it’s essentially the old “Additional SAL Achievements” field.

In the system we use to see an application (CCIMM) that “Additional Remarks” field is displayed as “Additional SAL Achievements”.  I’m seeing plenty of applicants who have found this box and have followed my advice.
I certainly appreciate the question and it gave me a reason to go back into the application and poke around a little bit.  I knew the “white space” was in there, just had to figure out where.  What I have found is that a lot of applicants don’t go all the way through the application and click on all the tabs and links.  There is a ton of information on the application website.  Based on many of the questions I see out there some folks aren’t looking at all of it, and it is not always easy to find. A perfect example is the “Additional Remarks” hidden all the way at the bottom of the last tab.

The Offer Letter…what’s it say, and what’s it mean

So, you have an offer, and you’re dying to know exactly what it entails.  I’m here to help you out. Here is a link to a copy of an offer letter from the first round 2015-16.

Offer letter

Here’s what it means:

The first thing to note is the word “conditional” in the first paragraph. Understand that this offer is still not locked in. You may see your selection status says pending medical qualification and administratively qualified.  What that means is that you still need to pass your DODMERB physical (become medically qualified) and that all other administrative requirements, like being enrolled full time, passing your APFT, and obtaining any waivers are complete before you will receive your benefits.

You may have completed a DODMERB for another branch or service academy. 9 times out of 10 that DODMERB will be reviewed by Army and will will also be good to go for this offer.  It still has to be reviewed, so make sure you let someone know. In my case I like to know that you had a DODMERB done already so that I can prompt DODMERB to expedite the review. If you haven’t started the DODMERB you want to get that started as soon as possible.  No need to panic, but sooner is better.

The scholarship tuition line says “FULL TUITION”.  This was not always the case.  Eleven years ago there was a cap on the tuition benefits. Some other branches (Air Force) have caps or limits on the benefit. With Army ROTC scholarships we pay full tuition and fees. You also have the option of using your scholarship to pay for Room and Board if you would prefer. We don’t pay for both. You may have received an offer to a school that provides Room and Board for Army ROTC scholarship winners, but we are only going to pay for one of those things and the other is between you and the school.

You will see a list of schools and whether you are offered a 4 or 3 year scholarship.  There may be more than one school. The instructions tell you that you need to select one school.  You need to make sure you select one school. That does not mean you can’t ask to change in the future, but for now you need to take your best guess and lock up that scholarship. Along with this letter you will also receive a set of instructions that will outline what you have to do if you want to request a change.  You can’t request a change if you haven’t accepted one of the offers.

The final thing I want to highlight is on page two.  The instructions say you need to accept one offer, sign the letter, and return the form.  You have three options for returning the form.  I can’t say it enough…Scan and email the form!!! I don’t know why anyone relies on the postal service or an old technology like a FAX to communicate important information any more.  The quickest, surest way to let Cadet Command know what you’ve decided is to email them. I would also suggest that you contact your school of choice and let them know what you’ve decided.

 

 

SAT or ACT scores

As the first board finishes it’s work this year I wanted to publish some thoughts on Test Scores, which are a critical part of the application.

What tests and scores are looked at?

if you submit SAT scores Cadet Command will look at your Math and Critical Reading scores. Your writing score will be posted, but it won’t factor into the points generated directly from the score (more on that later). If you take the SAT multiple times Cadet Command will use the highest score you get on each part for your total.   If you take the ACT your composite score is converted into an equivalent SAT score, which then generates points. So an ACT score of 19 correlates to a 920 SAT score and a 29 ACT score correlates to a 1300 SAT score.  You can find the full conversion table in Cadet Command Pamphlet 145-1 if you are really curious

Where do I get points for my application?

The first thing to understand is that your file is given a score by the scholarship process and this score is used to rank order all the applicants. That Order of Merit list is used to make scholarship offers. You SAT or ACT score effects your score in a couple different places. You get a score specifically for your SAT/ACT scores. You will also receive a score for your PMS interview. At least 20 points on that interview can be directly impacted by your test scores. Your test scores will also factor into you SAL score. Finally the board that looks at your file will consider your test scores when they score your file.  Test scores and PFT scores are probably the most quantifiable and least subjective parts of your application and are seen and considered more than any other piece of data.

How should I submit my scores?

You have a couple options. In my experience the least reliable way is to designate Army ROTC to receive your scores when you take them, or request the testing agency to submit send your scores to Cadet Command.  Sometimes they get sent, received, processed, and posted by the testing agency and Cadet Command and sometimes they don’t. In my mind the less hands anything you are trying to submit go though the better.  You can fax the test scores in. Once again, relying on a fax machine, and a person to post that to your application is risky. You can scan and email.  That’s getting better, you are probably only relying on the person that opens that email to post it. My recommendation is you upload your scores to your application right on the application website. You can scan or take a screen shot of your test scores and upload the file. Once you upload the file you will be able to see that it is there, and you won’t have to wonder where your scores are at.

And one last bit of wisdom

SAT and ACT scores are important.  I recommend you prep for them and do your best. The Army offers a free resource at March2success.com that you can use to prepare for the tests. You also need to make sure you are tracking when the tests are given and how that correlates with the deadlines for the scholarship process.  Typically if you wait until your senior year to take your SAT for the first time you won’t have your scores back in time to be seen by the first board.  If you don’t do well and need to retake the test then you may miss the second board too. I recommend taking SAT during your junior year to give yourself time to fix problems if you don’t do well the first time.

CULP trip 2015 – Georgia – Cadet O’Kosky

I’m starting to get my CULPers from this last Summer to get me their trip reports.  As usual we had GKBers traveling the globe doing great work and experiencing new cultures.  Here’s Cadet O’Kosky’s report from the Republic of Georgia and the Sachkhere Mountain School.

I was chosen to attend CULP in order to participate in a military to military mission in the Republic of Georgia. I had the opportunity to work side by side with Georgian soldiers and attend the Sachkhere Mountain School. There I was enrolled in the 19 day Basic Mountain Warfare course, along with 22 other cadets from different battalions from all over the country. Our mission was to interact with the soldiers, immerse ourselves the Georgian Army culture, and successfully complete the course.

descending

Cadet Guilyan O’Kosky and Cadet Alex Mikle prepare to descend a 70m rock face.

The course itself was very demanding both physically and mentally. Our days were filled with long hikes, rock climbing, and rucking through the Georgian countryside. Throughout the course we attended classes, briefings and demonstrations to help us learn as much as we could about the Georgian mountain operations and area we were operating in. During the course we were given small research projects about the Republic of Georgia’s history, the different cities we would visit each Saturday and current relations with its surrounding countries. Each Sunday, a group from each team would brief our class on their research and we would discuss how their relations effect their countries development and culture. Every Friday a group would brief on the city we would travel to the next day. They would cover the itinerary, and a brief history on how the city was developed. Monday through Friday we worked all day out in the sun applying the things we learned during instruction. We climbed natural rock faces, artificial walls, and rappelled at several different heights and faces.   In order to graduate from the course, I had to complete 5 tests during the last week of training. We were tested on knot tying, rock climbing, rappelling, a fixed rope climb, and an obstacle path. We also had complete a 32 mile hike into the Racha Mountains. This long excursion took us a day to reach our base camp 2000m above sea level, which was about 16 miles from our drop off point. The next morning we set out to accend another 250m altitude to the summit of the mountain range, before we packed up camp to head back down the mountain. The Major, who was the head instructor, told us that the hike was used to test soldiers on adapting to the different terrain and altitudes to determine who is qualified to move on to the intermediate course.   All 23 cadets successfully graduated from the basic mountain warfare course, and earned their Georgian mountain badge. I graduated second in my class and was the only female in the top 10.

Buddy Carry

The US cadets had an opportunity to learn rescue carries and techniques This type of buddy carry is used to evacuate injured personal while descending the mountain.

During this mission I learned a lot about how important it is to know how to work with different types of people, and how no matter how much you know there is always room to learn more. Yes, I have rappelled and climbed before, but I have never had an instructor who didn’t really speak English. Not everyone has had the same experience I had, so I was the motivator and tried to be as helpful as I could be to my buddies when they got frustrated. I learned so much about climbing techniques and different mountain movements while we were at the school. My overall experience was incredible. The people I met on the trip are some of the best individuals I have ever worked with so far. I learned that the best way to deal with a language barrier besides using an interpreter, is to point to objects. A lot of the time when we were climbing and the instructors were trying to help us, they would find these big sticks and point to a new hand hold or point to the best lane of travel. I learned that it is so important to listen to others ideas and advice even if you are in a leadership position. The Cadre that were with us, participated in the course as well, and even though they have done some of the stuff we were doing throughout their careers they looked to us for little tips about things like climbing because we could see things from different points of view. I think that goes hand in hand with any type of leadership situation, we all see things from a different point of view, and even though I may be the one in charge doesn’t mean my way is the best way. I learned that sometimes in order to find the best way to do something, you have to look to others for guidance or to bounce ideas off of.

Good report from Cadet O’Kosky.  I’m a little jealous.  Having the opportunity to attend a school like that as a Cadet is a once in a lifetime experience and I’m glad she had the opportunity and was able to share it with us..

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