Change to deadlines

Just a quick blog post today.  Due to the unsettled weather in the south (huricanes) the deadline for submission for the first board has changed and the board date was pushed back.  I have updated my previous post about this years dates and I am sharing the info right off the application website.

To apply for the ROTC Scholarship, an application must be started by 04 February 2018 @ 1159pm EST.

If you have started an application by 04 February 2018, you have until 04 March 2018 @ 1159pm EST to complete your application.

To appear before a Selection Board to be considered for a scholarship, applicants must submit a completed
application, including the PMS interview, by 1159pm EST on one of the below “Document Submission Deadlines.”

Document Submission Deadlines

1st High School Board:
1 October 2017

2nd High School Board:
07 January 2018

3rd High School Board:
04 March 2018

Selection Board Convene Dates

1st High School Board:
16-20 October 2017

2nd High School Board:
22-26 January 2018

3rd High School Board:
19-23 March 2018

NOTE: Applicants who were previously boarded but not selected to receive a scholarship, can continue to submit documents to increase their chance for selection.
However, all application updates must be SUBMITTED no later than 04 March 2018@ 1159pm EST to be considered for a scholarship during the final board that convenes on 19-23 March 2018.

You have a little breathing room, but trust me…these deadlines sneak up on you and if you are like most applicants you lead a busy life.

 

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Board Dates 2017-2018 scholarship boards

Here they are, the dates for this fall/winter’s board dates. If you are applying for a four year high school Army ROTC scholarship that will start in the fall of 2018, that would be a high school senior in the fall of 2017, these are the dates you should pay attention to.

4-year High School Application Opens for SY 18-19 12-Jun-17
1st High School Selection Board Deadline for Documents 17-Sep-17
1st High School Selection Board 2-Oct-17
2nd High School Selection Board Deadline for Documents 7-Jan-18
2nd High School Selection Board 22-Jan-18
4-Year High School Application Deadline for SY 18-19 4-Feb-18
Final HS Selection Board Deadline for Docs — Missing Items 4-Mar-18
Final (3rd) High School Selection Board  19-Mar-18

So, what does all this mean.  Same advice as last year…You should complete your application before the board that makes you the most competitive.  I would recommend you try to get in on one of the first two boards.  Waiting till the deadline and being seen by just one board is never the best course of action.  If you have a strong file you should be shooting to have your file complete by 17 September and reviewed by the first board.

Look at SAT/ACT dates. If you don’t do so well the first time you take those tests again. Your second shot is usually some time shortly after the October board, so you should be shooting for the second board and submitting improved scores if your file isn’t strong. Here’s where you can get some help with those tests, use it.

If you wait until the second or third board your chances are diminished because there will obviously be less allocations available after each board but don’t rush to be on the first board if you aren’t ready.  I would tell you that you shouldn’t wait to be able to do one or two more push ups on the PFT, but if your SAT/ACT is low retake and wait for the next board.

As you go through the process make sure you read about all the components (this blog is a good source of information, if I do say so myself) and stay in touch with at least one of the recruiting officers at one of the schools on your list. Notice I said recruiting Officer, and not recruiter…there is still a difference.

Stop the madness…Sending in your decision

I’ve written about contacting Cadet Command a few times in the past (here and here) and obviously old posts don’t get read.  Some of this information is dated, but the basic premise is the same. This may become an annual blog post. I have been contacted and I have seen discussion board posts where an applicant is not sure what their status is and wants to know how they can verify that their acceptance had been received. They invariably go on to say that they have emailed and faxed and mailed their response. In response, here is my advice

Do what Cadet Command asks you to do

Here’s what the letter they sent you says:

Mail this form to the address in the return address block OR fax to (502) 624-1120 OR scan and e-mail to usarmy.knox.usacc.mbx.train2lead@mail.mil

It doesn’t say “AND“, it says “OR“.

 

Scan and email

This is the surest way to make sure your response is received.  You’ll have a document in your sent folder in your email, and you don’t have to wonder if there is paper in the fax machine, or if the letter got delivered 5 days from now.

If you send your response multiple times you are just bogging down the system.  The same people that are opening the mail everyday and scanning the responses are also getting responses off  the fax machine, and checking the email and processing responses.  If they get a paper response they still have to scan and upload that response.  If they get a digital copy of your response in an email you just saved them a step.

Check your application status

There are a couple ways you can verify that your decision was received.  If you check your online application your acceptance letter will eventually get uploaded to your documents, the same way your offer letter was.  If you see it uploaded then Cadet Command has received it. I don’t think your status will change from “offer”, so don’t let that bother you.   The ROO at your school of choice should also be able to see that you accepted the offer. Touching base with him or her will also keep that line of communications open with the ROO and let them know you are excited to be joining their program.

Hope that helps…let’s not bog down the system.

Selection Status…What is my status?

This post is going to be short and sweet.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked by an applicant what their status is.  I ping my applicants often to let them know what they are missing, whether they have been boarded or not, and if they have an offer coming or not.  Looking at the online application today I realized all the answers are right there on the application website. If you have started an application, then you can log on to that application here. When you do you can click on the application tab, and then the selection status tab and you will be on this page:

selectionstatus

You selection status can be found in the Application tab

And there is your status.  Your status has a nice pretty color (green is good, red is bad) and it puts a red box around YOUR status…mine is Eligible, and it explains what it means.  This is one of those parts of the application that could put me out of business as a know it all blogger…the information is all right here.

How many of you already knew this?

 

Lessons learned from last year’s process

This blog post should have been published back in June, but it’s not too late to share the info.  I like to think I’m pretty helpful with the scholarship process.  We are just through the first round of offers for this year, and I’m hoping I can replicate my stats from last year.

The Army ROTC high school scholarship process is a over for the class of 2020.  It was another good year for me and I’m happy with the way it went for my applicants.  Because my high school campaign is my priority, and it is where I can set the Battalion up for success, I look closely at the statistics to see how we did.  So what did I see this year?

  • 80 applicants started an application and listed one or more of my schools (Clarkson, St Lawrence, SUNY Potsdam, or SUNY Canton)
  • 60 of those applicants provided enough information to be seen on the PMS list in our system and visible to us without having to hunt for them.  That means they were in an interviewee status and were eligible to interview with a PMS
  • 35 of those applicants got an offer.
  • 20 of those offers were to the Golden Knight Battalion
  • 9 accepted their offer to the GKB
  • I was able to offer one additional 3AD offer, which was accepted.

What else did I learn?

It looks like the uploading of offers happened quicker and the release of results was almost instantaneous this year.  For the last round, by the time I could see offers being posted the status in the applicants website was changing.  We (programs) were still instructed not to contact winners until offer letters were mailed, but we got the go ahead quicker.

I also spent some time poking around the application website and realized that if an applicant would spend a little time reading all the information on the website many of the answers to frequently asked questions are right there (go figure). This process is not something that can be explained in a paragraph or two, so careful reading of provided information is always a good practice.

 

Another point of view

One of my “fishing holes”, where I go to help interested students and find possible recruits is the Service Academy Forums.  There is a sub-forum on the site just for ROTC, and there is a ton of information and interesting discussions about the process.  The other day one of the regular posters, Dckc88, posted on a thread about listing colleges on the application. I thought the post was dead on, and echoed a lot of the information I espouse. Thought I’d share that information with my readers on the blog.

 Have her start the application and it will answer a lot of your questions to read through it, it just opened up. There is no rush to finish it. The first board meets in October giving her plenty of time to investigate, work on it over time, and change her mind about things as many times as she needs to, to get it right.

The only thing she cannot change once she starts it is the “survey”. It is a type of personality test to see if she is a fit as an Army officer and tries to predict if she will be career service (I read the study prepared by the Army when they instituted the test). It is worth a lot of points, so she wants to not rush through that, take it when she is in a good state of mind and has time to start and finish it, because once you start, that is her one opportunity!

When she selects a major on the application, then the schools that allow that major will be visible in the drop down box. For example if she selects nursing (using that example because I have lived it), then when she selects a specific state, only the schools that allow a cadet to study nursing with an ROTC scholarship will show up in the drop down box (she should also verify with the ROO after she contacts them). My daughter actually started her application early too, saw what schools were eligible in the states she was interested in, contacted those ROO’s (Recruiting Operations Officers) and even visited schools before she submitted her application with her school choices. She listed 4 (7 are allowed). Have her go into the school selection part of her application, put in different majors and just see what schools are eligible. After she identifies a few, she can even look at the school’s websites and sometimes be able to tell if the school is a host school (where the battalion is located), a satellite school (affiliated with a host school but many times have their own PT and military science classes on campus), or an affiliate school (typically has to do MS classes and PT somewhere else). If that school is not a host school, then contacting the ROO at the host school is going to be the easiest way to get her questions answered. My daughter had zero response from non-host school staff, contacting the ROO at the host school is what I wish we knew about earlier! My daughter also chose all but one school that she absolutely knew she would get into and get academic money for without a national scholarship, so she could show up in the fall and start ROTC and then compete for a campus based as a plan B without a scholarship. Her only stretch school was the one required school to be located in our state. She was iffy as to whether she would get in (initially wait listed, then accepted later in the spring) After she received the national scholarship, she decided on attending her stretch school. It was also a stretch school for ROTC because she had been told that it was competitive for nursing ROTC, only 3 slots at that school and direct entry nursing as a freshman meant it is a popular choice. My point in telling this story is to illustrate what has been said before, getting a scholarship does not guarantee getting into a school. So picking realistic choices both for academics and to be competitive for a ROTC slot is crucial.

It is all very overwhelming, confusing, and a learn as you go process. There are many parents here, and students that have recently gone through the process. Keep posting, asking questions, and have your daughter check out the site too. Once you have 10 posts (respond to us on this thread to get your posts built up, they can be a word or two, they don’t need to be detailed), then you can send any of us a personal message. I have found every parent that I have reached out to with specific questions because they had specific experiences I was interested in all very helpful!

My general advice is (and I give it often)

1. Don’t be afraid to have her email Cadet Command for all things related to her application. Including but not limited to, you sent something in but it isn’t showing up in her portal or is not approved yet, showing disqualified, asking for something and you don’t know what it is, etc. Just email them, they are helpful and quick to respond.

2. Once she identifies a few schools and makes contacts with the ROO there, encourage her to ask them questions to. About her essay for example, or questions about what majors she can take, or can she switch, etc.?

3. If at all possible visit ROTC units, she (and you) will learn SO much at each visit. And she will gain some great contacts and a ROO or two as an ally in the process.

When in doubt, you can look here, but really need to ask the sources that are really in the process, the schools and Cadet Command are there to help, use them. Other than Clarksonarmy (Clarkson University ROO) and BAMA ROTC (Alabama ROO), and a few others, we are just parents and students!

The takeaways I got from the post are the things I have written about before:

The application is helpful, and starting it will answer a lot of your questions

Establish that dialogue with the ROO

Come see us. A campus visit is going to go a long way to helping you chose

Hope this helps…thanks to Dckc88 for the great post!

Are you a regular visitor to the Service Academy Forum?

 

Board dates 2016-2017 scholarship boards

Here they are, the dates for this fall/winter’s board dates. If you are applying for a four year high school Army ROTC scholarship that will start in the fall of 2017, that would be a high school senior in the fall of 2016, these are the dates you should pay attention to.

4-year High School Application Opens for SY 17-18 12-Jun-16
1st High School Selection Board Deadline for Documents 7-Oct-16
1st High School Board-Ready List PMS Deadline 21-Oct-16
1st High School Selection Board 24-Oct-16
2nd High School Selection Board Deadline for Documents 6-Jan-17
2nd High School Board-Ready List PMS Deadline 20-Jan-17
2nd High School Selection Board 23-Jan-17
4-Year High School Application Deadline for SY 16-17 10-Jan-17
Final (3rd) HS Selection Board Deadline for Docs — Missing Items 28-Feb-17
3rd High School Board-Ready List PMS Deadline 10-Mar-17
Final (3rd) High School Selection Board  13-Mar-17

So, what does all this mean.  Same advice as last year…You should complete your application before the board that makes you the most competitive.  I would recommend you try to get in on one of the first two boards.  Waiting till the deadline and being seen by just one board is never the best course of action.  If you have a strong file you should be shooting to have your file complete by 2 October and reviewed by the first board.

Look at SAT/ACT dates. If you don’t do so well the first time you take those tests your second shot is usually some time shortly after the October board, so you should be shooting for the second board and submitting improved scores if your file isn’t strong. Here’s where you can get some help with those tests, use it.

If you wait until the second or third board your chances are diminished because there will obviously be less allocations available after each board but don’t rush to be on the first board if you aren’t ready.  I would tell you that you shouldn’t wait to be able to do one or two more push ups on the PFT, but if your SAT/ACT is low retake and wait for the next board.

As you go through the process make sure you read about all the components (this blog is a good source of information, if I do say so myself) and stay in touch with at least one of the recruiting officers at one of the schools on your list. Notice I said recruiting Officer, and not recruiter…there is still a difference.